Artists or Vandals? Why Graffiti Art Receives Less Protection than Other Forms of Art and How Federal Law Should be Changed to Protect Graffiti Artists

This article analyzes whether current U.S. intellectual property law can protect street art from being copied, removed, sold, or destroyed without the street artist’s consent and proposes that copyright law should expand to specifically include graffiti law to ensure protection of outdoor street art, so as to avoid any confusion about its status as protectable art. In addition, the Visual Artists Rights Act of 1900 definition of “recognized stature” should be more clearly expressed to protect graffiti art.

A Tale of Two Buildings: A Case of Architectural Copyright Infringement in China

by Guest Blogger Nadia Kashem [Editor’s Note: Nadia Kashem is a first-year law student at Fordham University School of Law and former architectural student of The Spitzer School of Architecture at The City College of New York]. “Imitation is the sincerest of flattery,” Charles Caleb Colton once wrote.[1] For Zaha Hadid, this flattery came inContinue reading “A Tale of Two Buildings: A Case of Architectural Copyright Infringement in China”

#copyrightinfringement

Robin Thicke and Co. are seeking a declaratory judgment that the summer hit “Blurred Lines” (or is it #blurredlines?) does not infringe upon the Marvin Gaye song, “Gotta Give it Up.” Decide for yourself here and here. Talk about “blurred lines”….  GET IT? The Attorney General of the SDNY and New York office of the FBI charged James Meyer, JasperContinue reading “#copyrightinfringement”